Utilizing Learning Analytics to Support Study Success

An edited volume by

Dirk Ifenthaler, Dana-Krisin Mah, and Jane Yin-Kim Yau

to be published by Springer, New York (www.springer.com/book/9783319647913)

Introduction

Advances in educational technology have enabled opportunities to provide insight into how learners engage within the learning environment provided. The resulting availability of vast amounts of educational data can represent how students interact with higher education resources and further analysis may provide useful insights into learning behavior and processes. From a holistic point of view, learning analytics use static and dynamic educational information from digital learning environments, administrative systems, and social platforms for real-time modelling, prediction, and optimization of learning processes, learning environments, and educational decision-making. Accordingly, learning analytics are expected to provide benefits for all stakeholders (i.e., students, teachers, designers, administrators, etc.) in the higher education arena.

In particular, students may benefit from learning analytics through personalised and adaptive support of their learning journey. For example, students often enter higher education academically unprepared and with unrealistic perceptions and expectations of academic competencies for their studies. Both, the inability to cope with academic requirements as well as unrealistic perceptions and expectations of university life, in particular with regard to academic competencies, are important factors for leaving the institution prior to degree completion. Still, research in learning analytics and how they support students at higher education institutions is scarce.

Coverage

The edited volume “Utilizing Learning Analytics to Support Study Success” aims to provide insight into how educational data and innovative digital technologies contribute toward successful learning and teaching scenarios. It features four major themes:

Part I. Theoretical perspectives linking learning analytics and study success

Part II. Technological innovations for supporting student learning

Part III. Issues and challenges for implementing learning analytics at higher education institutions

Part IV. Case studies showcasing successfully implemented learning analytics strategies at higher education institutions

Call for Proposals

Prospective authors (co-authors are welcome) are invited to submit a chapter proposal, including title, abstract (max. 300 words), five keywords, and the part of the book (see above) not later than 01 September 2017 to Dirk Ifenthaler (dirk@ifenthaler.info).

The proposal should be a previously unpublished work. Upon acceptance of the chapter proposal, the final chapter should be completed not later than 01 March 2018. Contributions will be blind reviewed and returned with comments by 01 April 2018. Finalised chapters are due no later than 01 May 2018. The final contributions should not exceed 20 manuscript pages. Guidelines for preparing chapters will be sent to authors upon acceptance of the proposal.

Timeline

The following represents a timeline for completing the edited volume:

  • 01 September 2017: Proposal due including title, abstract, keywords
  • 01 October 2017: Notification and additional information for accepted authors
  • 01 March 2018: Draft chapters due
  • 01 April 2018: Chapters returned with reviewers’ comments
  • 01 May 2018: Final chapters due

Inquiries and Submissions

Please forward your inquires and submissions to:

Professor Dirk Ifenthaler

Learning, Design and Technology

University of Mannheim

Email: dirk@ifenthaler.info

Web: www.ifenthaler.info

Twitter: @ifenthaler

banner-celda-2017-vfinal

18 – 20 October 2017, Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal

Important Dates
– Submission Deadline: 7 April 2017
– Notification to Authors: 8 May 2017
– Final Camera-Ready Submission and Early Registration: until 5 June 2017
– Late Registration: after 5 June 2017
Conference: 18 – 20 October 2017

The Conference will be composed of several types of contributions:

  • Full Papers – These include mainly accomplished research results and have 8 pages at the maximum (5,000 words).
  • Short Papers – These include fresh concepts, preliminary research results but may also contain work-in-progress reports. These have 4 pages at maximum (2500 words).
  • Reflection Papers – These might review recent research literature pertaining to a particular problem or approach, indicate what the findings suggest, and/or provide a suggestion – with rationale and justification – for a different approach or perspective on that problem. Reflection papers might also analyze general trends or discuss important issues pertaining to learning and instruction in the digital age. These have two pages at maximum (1500 words). Authors will be asked to display their work in poster format and will take part in panel session.

All submissions will go through a double-blind refereeing process with at least two international experts.

Program Co-Chairs

Demetrios G Sampson, Curtin University, Australia (sampson@iti.gr)
J. Michael Spector, University of North Texas, USA (mike.spector@unt.edu)
Dirk Ifenthaler, University of Mannheim, Germany and Deakin University, Australia (dirk@ifenthaler.info)

We would like to invite you to submit your proposal for an edited volume on “Digital Workplace Learning – Bridging Formal and Informal Learning with Digital Technologies” to be published by Springer, New York.

Interested scholars should submit a 1-page proposal to Dirk Ifenthaler (dirk@ifenthaler.info) by 01 November 2016, including author’s name (co-authors are welcome), institution, tentative title, chapter outline (max. 300 words), and five keywords. Early submissions are encouraged. All submissions will undergo a rigorous double-blind peer review who will recommend full submissions from among the proposals.

Introduction

Digital learning is defined as any set of technology-based methods that can be applied to support learning and instruction. Emerging opportunities for digital learning include game-based learning, simulations, Massive Open Online Courses, social networks, learning analytics, or mobile applications. For corporate organisations, digital technologies enable the implementation of customised learning environments even on small scale. Hence, access to digital technologies changes learning in the workplace through cost effective delivery modes, easy to access leaning resources, and flexible learning environments. Currently, digital workplace learning is mostly implemented as formal learning environments, for example in the form of cooperate open online courses (COOCs). Yet, the opportunity for digital technology in workplace learning is the support of informal learning and fostering enablers for lifelong learning.

Coverage

The edited volume “Digital Workplace Learning” Opens external link in new windowhttp://www.springer.com/us/book/9783319462141 aims to provide insights into how digital technologies may bridge and enhance formal and informal workplace learning. It will feature four major themes:

Part I. Theory of Digital Workplace Learning
This section includes theoretical perspectives (e.g., self-regulated learning, formal vs. informal learning, motivation, social context) relevant to the issues and challenges educators are facing when implementing digital technologies for workplace learning.

Part II. Digital Technologies in Workplace Learning
This section includes insights into available digital technology as well as organisational requirements for technology-enhanced learning in the workplace.

Part III. Design, Implementation and Assessment
This section highlights issues and challenges for designing and implementing digital workplace learning as well as includes strategies for assessments of learning in the workplace.

Part IV. Case Studies and Innovative Approaches
Contributions to this section will include case studies, empirical research findings, and innovative examples from organisations which successfully adopted digital workplace learning.

Call for Proposals

Prospective authors (co-authors are welcome) are invited to submit a chapter proposal, including title, abstract (max. 300 words), five keywords, and the part of the book (see above) not later than 01 November 2016 to Dirk Ifenthaler (dirk@ifenthaler.info).
The proposal should be a previously unpublished work. Upon acceptance of the chapter proposal, the final chapter should be completed not later than 01 May 2017. Contributions will be blind reviewed and returned with comments by 01 June 2017. Finalised chapters are due no later than 01 June 2017. The final contributions should not exceed 20 manuscript pages. Guidelines for preparing chapters will be sent to authors upon acceptance of the proposal.

Proposed Timeline

The following represents a timeline for completing the edited volume:

  • 01 November 2016: Proposal due including title, abstract, keywords
  • 01 December 2016: Notification and additional information for accepted authors
  • 01 May 2017: Draft chapters due
  • 01 June 2017: Chapters returned with reviewers’ comments
  • 01 July 2017: Final chapters due

Inquires and Submissions

Please forward your inquires and submissions to:

Professor Dirk Ifenthaler
Learning, Design and Technology
Business School
University of Mannheim

Email: dirk@ifenthaler.info
Web: www.ifenthaler.info
Twitter: @ifenthaler

The Technology, Knowledge and Learning (TKNL) journal invites submissions for a special issue “Big data in higher education: Research methods and analytics supporting the learning journey” to be published in 2017.

One of the promises of big data in higher education is to enable a new level of evidence-based research into learning and instruction and make it possible to gain highly detailed insight into student performance and their learning trajectories as required for personalizing and adapting curriculum as well as assessment. In the new era of data-driven learning and teaching, researchers need to be equipped with an advanced set of competencies that encompass areas needed for computationally intensive research (e.g., data-management techniques for big data, working with interdisciplinary teams who understand programming languages as well as cognitive, behavioral, social and emotional perspectives on learning) and professional knowledge (including heuristics) that incline a researcher toward computational modeling when tackling complex research problems.

This special issue on data analytics focuses on the enabling computational approaches and challenges in research that support the journey of a learner from pre-university experiences, to marketing and recruitment, to personalized learning, adaptive curriculum and assessment resources, to effective teaching, to post-university life-long learning.

Authors are encouraged to submit any of the manuscript types outlined below, including Work-in-Progress reports which highlight implemented systems in higher education and Emerging Technology reports focusing on data analytics applications. Interested scholars should submit a 1-page proposal including a tentative title, information about contributing author(s), abstract, article type (see below), keywords, and key references to David Gibson (david.c.gibson@curtin.edu.au) by 15 July 2016 – early submissions are encouraged. All proposals will be reviewed by the special issue review board who will recommend full submissions from among the proposals. All full manuscript submissions will undergo rigorous double-blind peer review by at least three reviewers of the special issue review board and regular TKNL reviewers who will recommend revisions or acceptance.

Important dates and manuscript submission process

Proposal submission:                                                    15 July 2016

Full manuscript invitation:                                           01 September 2016

Deadline for full manuscript submissions:               31 December 2016

Manuscripts returned to authors for revision:         01 March 2017

Final manuscripts due:                                                  31 May 2017

Publication of the Special Issue (TKNL 22/3):         15 October 2017

 

Select “S.I.: Big Data in Higher Education” when submitting your full manuscript via the editorial portal: www.editorialmanager.com/tknl

 

Please see descriptions below for manuscript types and requirements to be accepted for this special section – http://www.springer.com/10758?detailsPage=societies

Original Research: Original research papers primarily report findings from original quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods studies. The purpose of the reported study is expected to be theoretically well-ground, using a sound methodological approach, and providing a comprehensive source for practical implications. Original research manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Work-in-Progress Study: Work-in-progress studies provide early insights into leading research projects or document progressions of excellent on-going research. The idea of this article type is to showcase the progression of scholarly empirical work from the initial design and piloting of a research project to large-scale testing and implementation. This may include validity testing of instruments, revisions of learning environments, project snapshots and preliminary results, or replication of empirical studies. Work-in-progress study manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Integrative Review: An integrative review provides an overview and synthesizes relevant literature using an adequate method such as: Chronological (organized around a specific timeline), publication type (grouped by sources of research evidence), trends (identify different streams of the research over time), thematic (organized around topics or ideas), or methodological (grouped by research studies or projects). Integrative review manuscripts are expected to be between 4,000 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Emerging Technology Report: An emerging technology reports reviews new developments in educational technology by assessing the potentials and key challenges for leading digital learning environments. Emerging technology report manuscripts are limited to 3,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

 

To learn more about the general scope of the journal, please visit the Springer website: www.springer.com/10758

We look forward to your manuscripts!

 

Lead Editor, Special Issue

Associate Professor David C. Gibson, Curtin University

https://ctl.curtin.edu.au/global/dir_directors.cfm/David.C.Gibson

https://www.researchgate.net/profile/David_Gibson12

david.c.gibson@curtin.edu.au

 

Editor-in-Chief

Professor Dirk Ifenthaler

www.ifenthaler.info

dirk@ifenthaler.info

Guest Editors
Monica W. Tracey, Wayne State University and Dirk Ifenthaler, University of Mannheim, Deakin University

Ethics are embedded in educational technology encouraging researchers and practitioners to commit to the individual, society and profession while designing and performing research in the field.

This special issue in Educational Technology Research & Development will be the forum for scholarly research on ethical principles in design and learning analytics. It will provide an opportunity for empirical evidence as well as practical implications for the field. We are seeking manuscripts that address two areas of focus: (1) the relationship between ethics and design, and (2) ethical and privacy principles for learning analytics. Specific topics may include, but are not limited to:

• Research on the relationship between ethics and design
• Contributions on ethics and privacy issues related to learning analytics
• The place of a code of ethics in the practice of an Educational Technology
• Internalizing professional ethics in design and learning analytics
• Research related to ethics and privacy principles in design and learning analytics
• Thinking like a designer: Studies in ethics during design
• Research and implications on the design and development of learning analytics frameworks

This call solicits research or development articles that address one or more of the areas of focus listed above. The manuscripts can be conceptual articles based on critical analysis and significant review of literature or empirical studies with novelty and originality aiming at advancing our knowledge and research in the area of ethics in the field.

Interested scholars should submit a 3-page proposal including a tentative title, information about contributing author(s), abstract, keywords and key references to Monica Tracey (monicatracey@wayne.edu) by July 15, 2015. Early submissions are encouraged. All proposals will undergo a rigorous review of the special issue review board who will recommend full submissions from among the proposals. All full manuscript submissions will undergo rigorous double-blind peer review by at least three reviewers of the special issue review board and regular ETR&D reviewers who will recommend revisions or acceptance. Questions regarding the special issue should be directed to Monica Tracey (monicatracey@wayne.edu).

Schedule:

July 15, 2015: 3-page proposal due
August 15, 2015: Invitation will be sent to selected authors to submit their full manuscript
November 30, 2015: Full manuscript submission deadline
January 31, 2016: Reviewers’ feedback will be sent to authors
March 01 2016: Revised manuscripts due from authors
April 30, 2016: Reviewers’ feedback will be sent to selected authors
May 31, 2016: Final revised manuscripts due from authors

Foundations of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials: Demonstrating and Recognizing Knowledge and Competencies

An edited volume by

Dirk Ifenthaler

Nicole Bellin-Mularski

Dana-Kristin Mah

to be published by Springer, New York

Website: http://www.springer.com/book/978-3-319-15424-4

Download the Call for Chapters: DigitalBadges_CfP

Introduction

Digital Badges represent a valid indicator of specific achievements, knowledge, skills, and competencies that can be earned in formal and informal learning environments. Digital Badges represent an opportunity to recognize such achievements through credible organizations that can be integrated in traditional educational programs but can also represent experience in informal contexts or community engagement. Furthermore, instructional designers can use badges to motivate and influence engagement by providing for example focused goals or challenging tasks.

Coverage

The edited volume “Foundations of Digital Badges and Micro-Credentials” aims to provide insight into how Digital Badges may enhance formal and informal education by focusing on technological design issues including organizational requirements, instructional design, and deployment. It will feature current research exploring the theoretical foundation and empirical evidence of the utilization of Digital Badges as well as case studies that describe current practices and experiences in the use of Digital Badges for motivation, learning, and instruction in K-12, higher education, workplace learning, and further education settings. The edited volume is divided into four major parts:

Part 1. Theoretical Foundation of Digital Badges

This section includes theoretical perspectives (e.g., learning, motivation, assessment) relevant to the issues and challenges educators are facing when implementing digital badges and micro-credentials.

Part 2. Technological Frameworks and Implementation

This section includes insights into available technology for designing and implementing digital badges as well as organizational requirements for the deployment of digital badges.

Part 3. Instructional Design Considerations

This section suggests instructional design considerations.

Part 4. Case Studies: Practices and Experiences

Contributions to this section will include case studies, empirical research findings, and examples from institutions which adopted digital badges.

Call for Proposals

Prospective authors (co-authors are welcome) are invited to submit a chapter proposal, including a title, abstract (max. 300 words), five keywords, and the part of the book for their contribution (via e-mail) not later than 30 January 2015.

The proposal should be a previously unpublished work. Upon acceptance of the chapter proposal, the final chapter should be completed not later than 01 July 2015. Contributions will be double blind reviewed and returned with comments by 01 September 2015. Finalised chapters are due no later than 01 November 2015. The final contributions should not exceed 20 manuscript pages. Guidelines for preparing your chapter will be sent to you upon acceptance of your proposal.

Proposed Timeline

The following represents a timeline for completing the volume:

  • 01 January 2015: Call for contributions
  • 30 January 2015: Proposal due including title, abstract, keywords & chapter
  • 01 February 2015: Notification and additional information for authors and templates
  • 01 July 2015: Draft chapters due
  • 01 September 2015: Chapters returned with reviewers’ comments
  • 01 November 2015: Final chapters due

Inquires and Submissions

Please forward your inquires and submissions to:

Professor Dirk Ifenthaler

Email: dirk@ifenthaler.info

Web: www.ifenthaler.info

Twitter: @ifenthaler

Gamification: Establishing Evidence for Learning

The Technology, Knowledge and Learning (TKNL) journal invites submissions for a special section “Gamification: Establishing Evidence for Learning” to be published in 2015.

TKNL emphasizes the increased interest on context-aware adaptive and personalized digital learning environments. Rapid technological developments have led to new research challenges focusing on digital learning, gamification, automated assessment, and learning analytics. These emerging systems aim to provide learning experiences delivered via online environments as well as mobile devices and tailored to the educational needs, the personal characteristics and the particular circumstances of the individual learner or a (massive) group of interconnected learners.

Within this established paradigm, an emerging trend is the integration of components or features of games in a learning environment – called gamification. This practice is primarily used to facilitate motivation or connect learners within online learning environments. Examples include leaderboards, challenges, rewards, or social components. In order to establish empirical evidence for gamification directly effecting learning processes in learning environments (school, workplace, higher education), case studies, experimental research, and design-based research papers will be featured in the forthcoming special section of TKNL. Additionally, authors are encouraged to submit Emerging Technology Reports focusing on gamification.

Important dates and manuscript submission process

  • Deadline for full manuscript submissions: 31 January 2015
  • Manuscripts returned to authors for revision: 01 March 2015
  • Final manuscripts due: 01 June 2015
  • Publication: 01 September 2015

Select “S.I.: Gamification” when submitting your manuscript via the editorial portal: http://www.editorialmanager.com/tknl/

Please see descriptions below for manuscript types and requirements to be accepted for this special section – http://www.springer.com/10758?detailsPage=societies

Original Research: Original research papers primarily report findings from original quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods studies. The purpose of the reported study is expected to be theoretically well-ground, using a sound methodological approach, and providing a comprehensive source for practical implications. Original research manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Work-in-Progress Study: Work-in-progress studies provide early insights into leading research projects or document progressions of excellent on-going research. The idea of this article type is to showcase the progression of scholarly empirical work from the initial design and piloting of a research project to large-scale testing and implementation. This may include validity testing of instruments, revisions of learning environments, project snapshots and preliminary results, or replication of empirical studies. Work-in-progress study manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Integrative Review: An integrative review provides an overview and synthesizes relevant literature using an adequate method such as: Chronological (organized around a specific timeline), publication type (grouped by sources of research evidence), trends (identify different streams of the research over time), thematic (organized around topics or ideas), or methodological (grouped by research studies or projects). Integrative review manuscripts are expected to be between 4,000 and 7,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Emerging Technology Report: An emerging technology reports reviews new developments in educational technology by assessing the potentials and key challenges for leading digital learning environments. Emerging technology report manuscripts are limited to 2,500 words including references, tables, and figures.

To learn more about the general scope of the journal, please visit the Springer website: http://www.springer.com/10758

We look forward to your manuscripts!

Editor-in-Chief

Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

www.ifenthaler.info

dirk@ifenthaler.info

The Technology, Knowledge and Learning (TKNL) journal invites submissions for a special section “Learning with Data: Visualization to Support Teaching, Learning, and Assessment” to be published in 2015.

TKNL emphasizes the increased interest on context-aware adaptive and personalized digital learning environments. Rapid technological developments have led to new research challenges focusing on digital learning, gamification, automated assessment, and learning analytics. These emerging systems aim to provide learning experiences delivered via online environments as well as mobile devices and tailored to the educational needs, the personal characteristics and the particular circumstances of the individual learner or a (massive) group of interconnected learners.

Within this established paradigm, this special section has a specific focus upon factors of learning associated with interactive data visualizations, both in terms of learning analytics (for self-assessment and continued learning) and learning experiences which are centered around the visualization, consumption, collection, analysis, and/or manipulation of various data sets – regardless of subject area and across all ages of learners.

Important dates and manuscript submission process

  • Deadline for full manuscript submissions:  30 December 2014
  • Manuscripts returned to authors for revision:  01 February 2015
  • Final manuscripts due:  31 March 2015
  • Publication:  01 June 2015

 

Select “S.I.: Learning with Data” when submitting your manuscript via the editorial portal: http://www.editorialmanager.com/tknl/

Please see descriptions below for manuscript types and requirements to be accepted for this special section – http://www.springer.com/10758?detailsPage=societies

Original Research: Original research papers primarily report findings from original quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods studies. The purpose of the reported study is expected to be theoretically well-ground, using a sound methodological approach, and providing a comprehensive source for practical implications. Original research manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Work-in-Progress Study: Work-in-progress studies provide early insights into leading research projects or document progressions of excellent on-going research. The idea of this article type is to showcase the progression of scholarly empirical work from the initial design and piloting of a research project to large-scale testing and implementation. This may include validity testing of instruments, revisions of learning environments, project snapshots and preliminary results, or replication of empirical studies. Work-in-progress study manuscripts are expected to be between 4,500 and 8,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Integrative Review: An integrative review provides an overview and synthesizes relevant literature using an adequate method such as: Chronological (organized around a specific timeline), publication type (grouped by sources of research evidence), trends (identify different streams of the research over time), thematic (organized around topics or ideas), or methodological (grouped by research studies or projects). Integrative review manuscripts are expected to be between 4,000 and 7,000 words including references, tables, and figures.

Emerging Technology Report: An emerging technology reports reviews new developments in educational technology by assessing the potentials and key challenges for leading digital learning environments. Emerging technology report manuscripts are limited to 2,500 words including references, tables, and figures.

To learn more about the general scope of the journal, please visit the Springer website: http://www.springer.com/10758

We look forward to your manuscripts!

Editor-in-Chief

Prof. Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler

www.ifenthaler.info

dirk@ifenthaler.info

Lead Editor, Special Section

Dr. Benjamin E. Erlandson

www.vesiclab.org

ben.erlandson@gmail.com

This edited book is scheduled to be published by Springer Science+Business Media in 2015. Editors of the book are Dr. Christian Sebastian Loh and Dr. Yanyan Sheng from the Southern Illinois University at Carbondale, IL, and Dr. Dirk Ifenthaler from Deakin University, Melbourne, Australia. This is the first edited volume in the Advances in Game-Based Learning series to be edited by Scott Warren and Dirk Ifenthaler.

Motivation

There has been much interest in gathering data for analytics in the area of digital games for monetization and e-learning through MOOC to optimize learning and the environment in which it occurs. On the surface, it appears that either game analytics, or game + learning analytics, would be directly applicable to serious games. However, this is yet to be proven because the analytics from one industry may not easily transfer to another. Serious games analytics need to focus upon the performance of play-learners – a new word to mean players who are also learners (or vice versa), and not only in monetization or the optimization of learning environment. It is by observing the actions of play-learners within a serious game environment and understanding their decision-making processes that one can identify appropriate metrics for performance measurement, assessment, and improvement with game-based learning.

At this moment, researchers in Serious Games research and development are concerned about improving the design and utility of serious games to increase their success in training, learning, and instruction. But how could stakeholders ascertain what play-learners have achieved through serious game-play and whether the actions performed have actually improved performances?

Related Work

Researchers from the fields of Human-Computer Interactions, Computer Science, and Education have become interested in tracking and visualizing the play-learners’ actions and behaviors in the virtual gaming environments as a direct evidence of learning through change in behaviors. Innovative works in this area include: collecting data via telemetry, tracing play-learners’ actions and behaviors for analysis, profiling and modeling, visualizing and mining user-generated gameplay data for performance measurement, assessment, and improvement.  Related works in the education and training communities include Learning Progress Maps, Action Maps, Information Trails, and the use of expert-novice similarity index as a performance metric for serious games analytics. 

Purpose

The purpose of this edited volume is to collect in one place how gameplay data in serious games may be captured and converted into analytics (or, actionable insights) for performance measurement, assessment, and improvement. The editors would like this book to become the ‘go-to’ reference for empirical research methodologies for serious games analytics with methodologies from various fields of expertise, including: computer science, software engineering, learning science, human-computer interactions, educational data mining, statistics, information visualization, learning system design and technology, and others.

This edited volume will include (but not limited to) the following areas:

  1. Introduction to Serious Games Analytics
  2. Methods for learners’ gameplay data collection
  3. Methods for learners’ gameplay data analysis
  4. Methods for visualizing learners’ play-paths
  5. Methods to convert raw information into actionable insights (i.e., analytics)
  6. Possible application of Serious Games Analytics into other ‘virtual environments,’ such as virtual worlds, simulations, augmented reality, etc.

Important Dates

  • Feb 1, 2014 – 1st call letter requesting contributions
  • Mar 1, 2014 – Detailed information for 1st call authors
  • Mar 1, 2014 – 2nd call letter requesting contributions (if needed)
  • Apr 1, 2014 – Detailed information for 2nd call authors
  • Aug 1, 2014 – Draft chapter due (1st and 2nd call)
  • Aug15, 2014 – Draft chapters send to reviewers
  • Oct 1, 2014 – Draft chapters returned to authors with editorial comments
  • Dec 15, 2014 – Final chapters due

Proposal Submission

Interested scholars should submit a 1-page proposal to Dr. Christian S. Loh by February 15, 2014, including author’s name (co-authors are welcome), institution, tentative title, chapter outline, and five keywords. Early submissions are encouraged. All submissions will undergo a rigorous double-blind peer review by two reviewers who will recommend full submissions from among the proposals.

Questions regarding the special issue should be directed to:

Dr. Christian S. Loh (sgame.analytics@gmail.com)
Director, Virtual Environment Lab
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, IL, USA

Track Chairs

Dirk Ifenthaler, Open Universities Australia, Australia [Coordinator dirk@ifenthaler.info]
Deniz Eseryel, University of Oklahoma, USA
Gerald Knezek, University of North Texas, USA
Cher Ping Lim, The Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
Lin Lin, University of North Texas, USA

Track Program Committee

  • Mohammad AL-Smadi, Tallinn University, Estonia
  • Chris Bigenho, Greenhill School, USA
  • David Bonner, University of Mary Hardin-Baylor, USA
  • May Chan, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  • Liping Deng, Hong Kong Baptist University, Hong Kong
  • Benjamin E. Erlandson, Essential Complexity, USA
  • Frank Goldhammer, German Institute for International Educational Research, Germany
  • Maree Gosper, Macqurie University, Australia
  • Samuel Greiff, University of Luxemburg, Luxemburg
  • Holly Henry, University of Missouri, USA
  • Vincent Hung, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  • Tristan E. Johnson, Northeastern University, USA
  • Greg Jones, University of North Texas, USA
  • Ferial Khaddage, Deakin University, Australia
  • Siu Cheung Kong, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  • Ming Lai, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  • Victor Law, University of New Mexico, USA
  • Jennifer Lee, University of North Texas, USA
  • Ivana Marenzi, Leibniz University Hannover, Germany
  • Leila Mills, University of North Texas, USA
  • Eugenia Ng, Hong Kong Institute of Education, Hong Kong
  • Cathie Norris, University of North Texas, USA
  • Pablo Pirnay-Dummer, University of Passau, Germany
  • Elliot Soloway, University of Michigan, USA
  • William Stowe, Kilgore College, USA
  • Scott Warren, University of North Texas, USA
  • Sascha Wüstenberg, University of Luxemburg, Luxemburg

Track Description and Topics of Interest

Disruptive changes in learning and instruction through emerging technologies require new perspectives for the design and development of learning environments. Closely linked to the demand of new approaches for designing and developing learning environments is the necessity for enhancing the design and delivery of assessment systems and automated computer-based diagnostics. These systems need to accomplish specific requirements, such as adaptivity to different subject domains, flexibility for experimental and instructional settings, managing huge amounts of data, rapid and (near) real-time analysis of specific data, immediate feedback for learners, educators and learning designers, as well as generating automated reports of the diagnostics’ results. Further, sophisticated databases and network technologies contribute an especially wide variety of applications for technology-enhanced assessment. Hence, given the recent developments in educational data mining and learning analytics, technology-enhanced assessment may improve on-going learning through providing instant and rich feedback on the current stage of the learning process. This track aims to provide insights into the latest developments of research focusing on technology-enhanced assessment in formal and informal education.

Topics:

  • Technology-enhanced assessment of 21st Century skills
  • Linking learning analytics with technology-enhanced assessment
  • Design and development of technology-enhanced assessments for MOOCs
  • Using games and simulations for assessment in formal and informal education
  • Automated assessment for personalized and adaptive learning environments
  • Automated essay scoring